Blog: Son of Truth of Self
by Chef JeM

Dignity

General all-inclusive perspectives on dignity for all of mankind with a comment as to the possible degradation of dignity by way of masking.

Date:   9/21/2020 9:07:19 AM   ( 30 d ) ... viewed 223 times

October 6, 2020 - Final Words on Masks -

"We have to stop that deadly virus that is so incredibly virulent that, according to the CDC, 99.8% of those exposed to it survive. Wear your masks is the order of the day, but along the way, many, including the Surgeon General of the United States, have said it is a waste of time.

That did not stop Germany from becoming the first country to impose a fine on all non-mask wearers. Chancellor Angela Merkel announced during a virtual meeting in September with state governors that almost the entire country will be under a 50 euros minimum ($59) fine for breaching the national mask mandate.

The use of face masks has become a highly politicized issue throughout the pandemic, with some individuals claiming that wearing a mask can negatively impact a person’s breathing and put their health at risk. Others say it is a useless barrier that lets viral particles in and out with ease. Regardless, the central authorities in our world want you and your children to wear one.

Running, walking, or even socializing outside is not the cause of the vast majority of
coronavirus outbreaks, regardless of mask usage.

Health officials have gone back and forth on masks, but in general, they like to assure the public that face coverings can safely and effectively prevent the spread of COVID-19 respiratory droplets. Now, in what might be seen as a desperate move, they are promoting their safety with a study that assesses the changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide levels trying to put the best face on the dangers of mask-wearing.

In this study, researchers compared the breathing of each individual before and after wearing a surgical mask for thirty minutes that included a six-minute walking test. At the mark and 30 minutes after the walk, researchers found no significant changes in oxygen saturation or carbon dioxide levels.

This study might fool part of the public, but there are other studies that suggest N95 masks can cause significant hypoxia and hypercapnia that resulted in reductions in blood oxygen. In one study, researchers examined the blood oxygen levels in 53 surgeons using an oximeter. They measured blood oxygenation before surgery as well as at the end of surgeries.4 The researchers found that the mask reduced the blood oxygen levels (pa02) significantly. The longer the duration of wearing the mask, the greater the fall in blood oxygen levels. It is interesting that the present study only went on for 30 minutes.

By wearing a mask, the exhaled viruses will not be able to escape and will concentrate in the nasal passages, enter the olfactory nerves and travel into the brain.

'Do your part. Wear a mask.' The Centers for Disease Control has recommended as much since April. But in the months since, the cloth coverings that muffle voice and fog glasses and soak sweat and serve as a general annoyance have become a part of pandemic politics when it is a medical issue. Politicians might as well be weighing in on quantum mechanics. It is important to note that until recently, the CDC did not recommend wearing a face mask or covering of any kind unless a person was known to be infected.

There is a difference between the N95 respirator mask and the surgical mask (cloth or paper mask) in terms of side effects. The N95 mask, which filters out 95% of particles with a median diameter >0.3 µm2, impairs respiratory exchange (breathing) to a greater degree than a soft mask and is more often associated with headaches. In one such study, researchers surveyed 212 healthcare workers (47 males and 165 females) asking about headaches with N95 mask use, duration of the headaches, type of headaches, and if the person had preexisting headaches.

The pore size of cloth face coverings ranges from ~ 20-100 microns. The COVID virus is 200-1000x smaller than that, at 0.1 microns. Putting up a chain-link fence will not keep out a mosquito. Even the most esteemed medical journals admit their purpose is to calm anxiety. '"Expanded masking protocols" greatest contribution may be to reduce the transmission of anxiety,' writes Dr. Simonie Gold.

Unfortunately, no one is telling the frail elderly and those with lung diseases, such as COPD, emphysema, or pulmonary fibrosis, of these dangers when wearing a facial mask of any kind—which can cause a severe worsening of lung function. This also includes lung cancer patients and people having had lung surgery, especially with partial resection or even the removal of a whole lung.

Decreasing the amount of oxygen people are breathing, by forcing people to wear masks, is not such a good idea. Under the mask, O2 readings drop from a regular 21 to an unhealthy 17.5, ringing the alarm of the official OSHA devices that measure such things.

The usual amount of CO2 in the air is approximately 400 ppm, when measured around the nose of mouth, would be higher. But wear a mask and concentrations shoot up to 5,000. This is not healthy. Carbon dioxide in the air we breathe usually is at 0.0390 percent. When we breathe out, it is 4.0 percent.

The minimum oxygen concentration in the air required for human breathing is 19.5 percent. Approximately 78 percent of the air we breathe is nitrogen gas, while only about 20.9 percent is oxygen. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, OSHA, determined the optimal range of oxygen in the air for humans runs between 19.5 and 23.5 percent.

The importance of these findings is that a drop in oxygen levels (hypoxia) is associated with an impairment in immunity. Studies have shown that hypoxia can inhibit the type of main immune cells used to fight viral infections called the CD4+ T-lymphocyte. This occurs because the hypoxia increases the level of a compound called hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which inhibits T-lymphocytes and stimulates a powerful immune inhibitor cell called the Tregs.

People with cancer, especially if cancer has spread, will be at further risk from prolonged hypoxia as cancer grows best in a microenvironment that is low in oxygen. Low oxygen also promotes inflammation, which can promote the growth, invasion, and spread of cancers. Repeated episodes of hypoxia has been proposed as a significant factor in atherosclerosis and hence increases all cardiovascular (heart attacks) and cerebrovascular (strokes) diseases.

I wonder what the Surgeon General had to say about facemasks. Does it matter?

'Florida Sheriff Orders Deputies & Staff NOT to Wear Face Masks,' reads the headline. 'Marion County Sheriff Billy sent an email Tuesday informing the 900 people working in the department that “when you are on-duty/working as my employee and representing my Office – masks will not be worn,”' the Ocala Star-Banner reports.

Here’s what Dr. Fauci says: 'There’s no reason to be walking around with a mask. When you’re in the middle of an outbreak, wearing a mask might make people feel a little bit better, and it might even block a droplet, but it is not providing the perfect protection that people "think" that it is. And often, there are unintended consequences: People keep fiddling with the mask, and they keep touching their face.'

Government officials in the Netherlands will not ask citizens to wear masks, as they say, there is no clear evidence that doing so would slow the spread of the coronavirus. Instead of mandating facial coverings, the country will seek a solution that includes more physical distancing. 'Because from a medical perspective there is no proven effectiveness of masks, the Cabinet has decided that there will be no national obligation for wearing non-medical masks,' Dutch Minister for Medical Care Tamara van Ark said.

As America waits for a COVID-19 vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s director Robert Redfield said we all might be better protected by simply continuing to wear masks. 'I might even go so far as to say that this face mask is more guaranteed to protect me against COVID than when I take a COVID vaccine,' said Redfield, in testimony given to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Do Your Part. Wear A Mask?

(Vadim Kluchnik Dreamstime.com)

James Grundvig says the masks are the Swiss Army knife of the architects’ tool box; 1. They control people and make them subservient. 2. They allow AI face recognition software to identify people with masks on and off; 3. They prevent full communication using facial expressions.

Dr. Russell Blaylock warns that not only do face masks fail to protect the healthy from getting sick, but they also create serious health risks to the wearer. The bottom line is that if you are not sick, you should not wear a face mask.

The end goal of masks is to make you fall in line and to roll up your sleeves in the
biggest biological experiment in history.
Dr. Russell Blaylock

'As for the scientific support for the use of face mask, a recent careful examination of the literature, in which 17 of the best studies were analyzed, concluded that, "None of the studies established a conclusive relationship between mask/respirator use and protection against influenza infection." Keep in mind; no studies have been done to demonstrate that either a cloth mask or the N95 mask has any effect on the transmission of the COVID-19 virus. Any recommendations, therefore, have to be based on studies of influenza virus transmission. And, as you have seen, there is no conclusive evidence of their efficiency in controlling flu virus transmission,' concludes Blaylock.

Conclusion

Gary D. Barnett, writing about how the beauty of life is being destroyed by lockdowns and masks says, 'All of this ugly absurdity now exists, but the most beautiful thing in life is also being destroyed before our eyes. That is the beauty of love and caring. It was once said that “love is a many splendored thing," and that may be an understatement, as what more defines the human spirit than love? Today, people are wearing harmful and useless masks; they are told not to get close to any other; they are voluntarily, for the most part locking themselves inside home prisons and are not even allowed to work or be with co-workers. People are becoming unrecognizable zombies, frightened of all strangers, friends, and even family. Romance and passion are shunned and in some parts of the world forbidden due to this virus hoax, so many have acquiesced to this travesty, and now most all communication is via a cold and impersonal computer screen. The idea of a robotic humanity without feeling now seems possible, and is even being promoted; and in some parts of the world, it is being actively sought. This insanity is no longer science fiction, but is on the verge of reality. No good can come from this horror.'”[2]
-

***
September 21, 2020 -

Dignity is the right of a person to be valued and respected for their own sake, and to be treated ethically. It is of significance in morality, ethics, law and politics as an extension of the Enlightenment-era concepts of inherent, (u)nalienable rights. The term may also be used to describe personal conduct, as in "behaving with dignity".

Contents
1 Etymology
2 Modern use
3 Violations
3.1 Categories
3.2 Examples
4 Philosophical history
4.1 Pico della Mirandola
4.2 Kant
4.3 Mortimer Adler and Alan Gewirth
4.4 Others
5 Religion
6 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights
7 Medicine
7.1 International bodies
7.2 Canada
7.3 Denmark
7.4 France
7.5 Portugal
7.6 Sweden
7.7 United States
8 Law
8.1 Canada
8.2 European Union
8.3 France
8.4 Germany
8.5 India
8.6 Iran
8.7 South Africa
8.8 Switzerland
9 See also
10 References
11 Further reading
12 External links

Etymology
The English word "dignity", attested from the early 13th century, comes from Latin dignitas (worthiness) by way of French dignité.

Modern use
English-speakers often use the word "dignity" in prescriptive and cautionary ways: for example, in politics it can be used to critique the treatment of oppressed and vulnerable groups and peoples, but it has also been applied to cultures and sub-cultures, to religious beliefs and ideals, and even to animals used for food or research.

"Dignity" also has descriptive meanings pertaining to the worth of human beings. In general, the term has various functions and meanings depending on how the term is used and on the context.

In ordinary modern usage, the word denotes "respect" and "status", and it is often used to suggest that someone is not receiving a proper degree of respect, or even that they are failing to treat themselves with proper self-respect. There is also a long history of special philosophical use of this term. However, it is rarely defined outright in political, legal, and scientific discussions. International proclamations have thus far left dignity undefined, and scientific commentators, such as those arguing against genetic research and algeny, cite dignity as a reason but are ambiguous about its application.

Violations
Categories
Human dignity can be violated in multiple ways. The main categories of violations are:

Humiliation
Violations of human dignity in terms of humiliation refer to acts that humiliate or diminish the self-worth of a person or a group. Acts of humiliation are context dependent but we normally have an intuitive understanding where such a violation occurs. As Schachter noted, “it has been generally assumed that a violation of human dignity can be recognized even if the abstract term cannot be defined. ‘I know it when I see it even if I cannot tell you what it is’”. More generally, etymology of the word “humiliation” has a universal characteristic in the sense that in all languages the word involves “downward spatial orientation” in which “something or someone is pushed down and forcefully held there”. This approach is common in judicial decisions where judges refer to violations of human dignity as injuries to people's self-worth or their self-esteem.[

Instrumentalization or objectification
This aspect refers to treating a person as an instrument or as means to achieve some other goal. This approach builds on Immanuel Kant's moral imperative stipulating that we should treat people as ends or goals in themselves, namely as having ultimate moral worth which should not be instrumentalized.

Degradation
Violations of human dignity as degradation refer to acts that degrade the value of human beings. These are acts that, even if done by consent, convey a message that diminishes the importance or value of all human beings. They consist of practices and acts that modern society generally considers unacceptable for human beings, regardless of whether subjective humiliation is involved, such as selling oneself to slavery, or when a state authority deliberately puts prisoners in inhuman living conditions.

Comment regarding "slavery" and "Violations of human dignity as degradation" in the above quote: Slaves (as well as women in some countries who are granted equality with men) have been masked. Is the present-day masking of humanity degrading to our dignity? .........

Dehumanization
These are acts that strip a person or a group of their human characteristics. It may involve describing or treating them as animals or as a lower type of human beings. This has occurred in genocides such as the Holocaust and in Rwanda where the minority were compared to insects.
Examples
Some of the practices that violate human dignity include torture, rape, social exclusion, labor exploitation, bonded labor, and slavery.[7]

Both absolute and relative poverty are violations of human dignity, although they also have other significant dimensions, such as social injustice.[7] Absolute poverty is associated with overt exploitation and connected to humiliation (for example, being forced to eat food from other people's garbage), but being dependent upon others to stay alive is a violation of dignity even in the absence of more direct violations. Relative poverty, on the other hand, is a violation because the cumulative experience of not being able to afford the same clothes, entertainment, social events, education, or other features of typical life in that society results in subtle humiliation; social rejection; marginalization; and consequently, a diminished self-respect.

Another example of violation of human dignity, especially for women in developing countries, is lack of sanitation. Having no access to toilets leaves currently about 1 billion people of the world with no choice other than to defecation in the open, which has been declared by the Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations as an affront to personal dignity.[11] Human dignity is also violated by the practice of employing people in India for "manual scavenging" of human excreta from unsanitary toilets – usually by people of a lower caste, and more often by women than men.[12]

A further example of violation of human dignity, affecting women mainly in developing countries, is female genital mutilation (FGM).

The movie The Magic Christian depicts a wealthy man (Peter Sellers) and his son (Ringo Starr) who test the limits of dignity by forcing people to perform self-degrading acts for money. The Simpsons episode "Homer vs. Dignity" has a similar plot.

Philosophical history
Pico della Mirandola
A philosopher of the Renaissance, Pico della Mirandola, granted dignity to ideas and to beings. In his "Oration on the Dignity of Man", he told hostile clerics about the dignity of the liberal arts and about the dignity and the glory of angels. His comments implied the dignity of philosophers.[13] This oration is commonly seen as one of the central texts of the Renaissance, intimately tied with the growth of humanist philosophies.

Kant
A philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment (18th century), Immanuel Kant held that there were things that should not be discussed in terms of value, and that these things could be said to have dignity. 'Value' is necessarily relative, because the value of something depends on a particular observer's judgment of that thing. Things that are not relative – that are "ends in themselves", in Kant's terminology – are by extension beyond all value, and a thing is an end in itself only if it has a moral dimension; if it represents a choice between right and wrong. In Kant's words: "Morality, and humanity as capable of it, is that which alone has dignity."
Specifically with respect to human dignity, which his writings brought from relative obscurity in Western philosophy into a focal point for philosophers, Kant held that "free will" is essential; human dignity is related to human agency, the ability of humans to choose their own actions.

Mortimer Adler and Alan Gewirth
Philosophers of the late 20th century who have written significant works on the subject of dignity include Mortimer Adler and Alan Gewirth. Gewirth's views on human dignity are typically compared and contrasted with Kant's, for like Kant he theorizes that human dignity arises from agency. But while sharing Kant's view that rights arise from dignity, Gewirth focused far more than Kant on the positive obligations that dignity imposed on humans, the moral requirement not only to avoid harming but to actively assist one another in achieving and maintaining a state of "well being".

Among other topics, including the dignity of labor, Adler extensively explored the question of human equality and equal right to dignity. According to Adler, the question of whether humans have equal right to dignity is intrinsically bound in the question of whether human beings are truly equal, which itself is bound in the question of whether human beings are a distinct class from all things, including animals, or vary from other things only by degree. Adler wrote that the only sense in which it is true that all human beings are equal is that they are equally distinct from animals. "The dignity of man," he said, "is the dignity of the human being as a person—a dignity that is not possessed by things." To Adler, failure to recognize the distinction challenged the right of humans to equal dignity and equal treatment.

Others
Dan Egonsson, followed by Roger Wertheimer, argued that while it is conventional for people to equate dignity with 'being human' (Egonsson's 'Standard Attitude', Wertheimer's 'Standard Belief'), people generally also import something other than mere humanness to their idea of dignity. Egonsson suggested that an entity must be both human and alive to merit an ascription of dignity, while Wertheimer states "it is not a definitional truth that human beings have human status."

According to Arthur Schopenhauer, dignity is opinion of others about our worth and subjective definition of dignity is our fear from this opinion of others.

More recently, Philippe-André Rodriguez has argued that human dignity is best understood as an essentially contested concept. As he argues, "it seems that it is this very nature of the concept that has allowed, on the one hand, human rights to receive such international acceptance as a theoretical enterprise and, on the other hand, has led the concept to be constantly challenged by different cultures worldwide."

Religion
Human dignity is a central consideration of Christian philosophy The Catechism of the Catholic Church insists the "dignity of the human person is rooted in his or her creation in the image and likeness of God." "All human beings," says the Church, "in as much as they are created in the image of God, have the dignity of a person." The catechism says, "The right to the exercise of freedom belongs to everyone because it is inseparable from his or her dignity as a human person." The Catholic Church's view of human dignity is like Kant's insofar as it springs from human agency and free will,[18] with the further understanding that free will in turn springs from human creation in the image of God.

Human dignity, or kevod ha-beriyot, is also a central consideration of Judaism. Talmud cautions against giving charity publicly rather than in private to avoid offending the dignity of the recipient. Medieval Jewish philosopher Maimonides in his codification of Halakha cautioned judges to preserve the self-respect of people who came before them: "Let not human dignity be light in his eyes; for the respect due to man supersedes a negative rabbinical command".

An Islamic view of dignity is crystallized in the Quran through the selected biographies of Noah, Abraham, Joseph, David, Moses, Mary, Jesus and others (differing from the narratives in the Bible, which the Quran claims were corrupted). Individuals such as these are presented as role-models of dignity because they did not abandon their self-respect by bowing to social pressures. When faced with the fear of disapproval, poverty, hunger, death etc. these individuals held firm in their sense of right and wrong, which was in-line with Divine ordinances. "The right course is that on which one keeps his attitudes, ambitions and requirements subjected to the Divine Laws; and in this way leads a balanced and graceful life. Such a person has grasped the most trustworthy support which will never fail him" (Quran 31:22) Such individuals are given the title of Muhsineen, who faced immense pressures but held firm in their positive actions. God awarded these individuals with authority and status in the land, and this reward is open to anyone who proves themselves worthy: "We bestow such honour and position on all those who lead their lives according to Our Laws." (Quran 37:80) Those who fall into this category are also afforded Divine protection from their mistakes: "Therefore We have saved you and your son from this. We have done so because We keep those who lead their lives according to Divine guidance safe from such mishaps." (37:104-105) The Quranic State that Muhammad began in Medinah sought to protect human dignity, since in a Quranic Welfare State individuals are free to work and live without the pressures faced by the threat of poverty, and thus can obey God's Laws as free individuals, contributing as part of a unified brotherhood working towards achieving humanity's full potential. Elaborations on dignity have been made by many scholars of Islam, such as Mohammad-Ali Taskhiri, head of the Islamic Culture and Communications Organization in Iran, in 1994. According to Taskhiri, dignity is a state to which all humans have equal potential, but which can only be actualized by living a life pleasing to the eyes of God. This is in keeping with the 1990 Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam, which states that "True faith is the guarantee for enhancing such [basic human] dignity along the path to human perfection".

Human dignity is considered as Buddhahood in Mahayana Buddhism in which it is rooted in the idea that we are able to choose the path of self-perfection as a human being.

United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights
All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

— Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Articles 1 and 2
Medicine
In the 20th century, dignity became an issue for physicians and medical researchers. It has been invoked in questions of the bioethics of human genetic engineering, human cloning, and end-of-life care (particularly in such situations as the Terri Schiavo case, a controversial situation in which life support was withdrawn from a woman diagnosed in a persistent vegetative state).

International bodies
In June 1964, the World Medical Association issued the Declaration of Helsinki. The Declaration says at article 11, "It is the duty of physicians who participate in medical research to protect the life, health, dignity, integrity, right to self-determination, privacy, and confidentiality of personal information of research subjects."

The Council of Europe invoked dignity in its effort to govern the progress of biology and medicine. On 4 April 1997, the Council, at Oviedo, approved the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine. The convention's preamble contains these statements, among others:

Conscious of the accelerating developments in biology and medicine;

Convinced of the need to respect the human being both as an individual and as a member of the human species and recognizing the importance of ensuring the dignity of the human being;

Conscious that the misuse of biology and medicine may lead to acts endangering human dignity;

Resolving to take such measures as are necessary to safeguard human dignity and the fundamental rights and freedoms of the individual with regard to the application of biology and medicine.

The Convention states, "Parties to this Convention shall protect the dignity and identity of all human beings and guarantee everyone, without discrimination, respect for their integrity and other rights and fundamental freedoms with regard to the application of biology and medicine."

In 1998, the United Nations mentioned dignity in the UNESCO Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights. At Article 2, the declaration states, "Everyone has a right to respect for their dignity." At Article 24, the declaration warns that treating a person to remove a genetic defect "could be contrary to human dignity." The Commentary that accompanies the declaration says that, as a consequence of the possibility of germ-line treatment, "it is the very dignity of the human race which is at stake."

Canada
In 1996, the Government of Canada issued a report entitled New Reproductive and Genetic Technologies. The report used "the principles of respect for human life and dignity" as its reason for recommending that various activities associated with genetic research and human reproduction be prohibited. The report said the prohibited activities were "contrary to Canadian values of equality and respect for human life and dignity."

Denmark
The Ministry of Health enacted the Danish Council Act 1988, which established the Danish Council of Ethics. The Council advises the Ministry on matters of medicine and genetic research on humans. In 2001, the Council condemned "reproductive cloning because it would violate human dignity, because it could have adverse consequences for the cloned person and because permitting research on reproductive cloning would reflect a disregard for the respect due to the moral status of embryos."

France
In 1984, France set up the National Consultative Committee for Ethics in the Life and Health Sciences (CCNE) to advise the government about the regulation of medical practices and research. In 1986, the CCNE said, "Respect for human dignity must guide both the development of knowledge and the limits or rules to be observed by research." The CCNE said that research on human embryos must be subject to "the rule of reason" and must have regard for "undefined dignity in its practical consequences."[45] The CCNE insisted that, in research on human embryos, the ethical principles that should apply are "respecting human dignity" and respecting "the dignity of science."

Portugal
The National Council of Ethics of Portugal published its Opinion on the Ethical Implications of Cloning in 1997. The opinion states, "the cloning of human beings, because of the problems it raises concerning the dignity of the human person, the equilibrium of the human species and life in society, is ethically unacceptable and must be prohibited."

Sweden
Sweden's The Genetic Integrity Act (2006:351), The Biobanks in Medical Care Act (2002:297), Health and Medical Services (Professional Activities) Act (1998:531), and The Health and Medical Services Act (1982:763) all express concern for "the integrity of the individual" or "human dignity."

United States
In 2008, The President's Council on Bioethics tried to arrive at a consensus about what dignity meant but failed. Edmund D. Pellegrino, M.D., the Council's Chairman, says in the Letter of Transmittal to the President of The United States, "… there is no universal agreement on the meaning of the term, human dignity."

Law
McDougal, Lasswell, and Chen studied dignity as a basis for international law. They said that using dignity as the basis for laws was a "natural law approach." The natural law approach, they said, depends upon "exercises of faith." McDougal, Lasswell, and Chen observed:

The abiding difficulty with the natural law approach is that its assumptions, intellectual procedures, and modalities of justification can be employed equally by the proponents of human dignity and the proponents of human indignity in support of diametrically opposed empirical specifications of rights . . . .[1]
-

***********^***********
Notes:

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dignity

[2] https://drsircus.com/general/final-words-on-masks/
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