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Infrared Sauna Board
 
Juniper Berry Views: 2,537
Published: 17 years ago
 
This is a reply to # 158,568

Infrared Sauna Board


Constructing a Sauna at Home

Materials.

four 250-watt, red infrared bulbs (heat lamps), $7 each
four flush-mount bulb sockets, $2 each
one 15 foot long extension cord rated for 1625 watts) $2
pine board (14-15 inches by 40-48 inches) $14
an on-off switch (wall switch, cover, and box) $5
a thermometer (optional). $2

total cost: less than $70, including tax.

If you are building an enclosure, it can be of wood, glass or cardboard. No special materials or construction are required because the temperature stays mild. Build the unit at least 4' by 3' by 6' high. The heat may dissipate if the space is too large. Siding made of cedar or fir is a popular option. The tongue-and-groove siding slides into a frame and no nails are needed. Walls can be built as modules, then screwed together. (I don't have an enclosure. I just lean my board against the bathroom door, as my bathroom is very small.)

Construction. For the one-person sauna, mount the sockets on the pine board or enclosure wall in a diamond shape. The bottom socket is in the center, 12" from the bottom. Two sockets are 28" from the bottom of the plywood and 10" apart. The top socket is centered and 36" from the bottom. This should form a narrow diamond shape.

I drilled four holes at the appropriate locations in the wood before attaching the wired sockets and switch box so that none of the wiring would show from the front. (I predrilled holes for the screws and used drywall screws to attach the sockets to the board.) Wire the sockets together in parallel so one bad bulb won't disable the unit. In other words, cut the cord into five pieces: one section of cord will go to each bulb from the switch. The long cord that remains will already have a plug attached to the end, and that will connect to the other pole on the switch. Your cord needs to be copper. Mine had numerous thin strands of copper for both the "hot" wire, and the "neutral" wire. I'm not an electrician, but with the internet, you can learn to do anything, right? (You can google a single pole light switch and get more than enough information to do this simple wiring project, or check out a book at the library.) I made sure that the side of the wire that was embossed was the side that connected to the "hot" contact on the socket and the pole on the switch. I wired the four "hot" wires together before attaching them to the switch. I wired the "hot" wire (that had the plug attached) to the other pole on the switch. I wired all five of the "neutral" wires together without going through the switch. Be sure to wrap this connection with electrical tape and a special electrical cap. It sounds complicated if you've never wired before, and if you are mechanically handicapped, you might want to get some proper help completing your sauna board.

With each use, instead of plugging the unit in, it is easier to have a switch. The best is probably a wall switch that can handle 1000 watts with an outlet box. Keep sweaty hands off the switch as they could cause a short.

The bulbs must be the red type, 250 watts each. Do not use the clear ones as their spectrum is not correct. You must not touch the bulbs during use, or let water or anything touch them. Observe all cautions as with any appliance exposed to heat and moisture.

If children or the disabled will use the unit, consider a protective screen. Bend some chicken or stucco wire around the bulbs and staple it to the wood. Another way is to recess the bulbs or place them in reflectors. If building an enclosure, you could place the bulbs behind. The enclosure needs be small enough to hold the heat, and large enough to allow turning around.

Ventilate the sauna no matter where you locate it. In a bathroom or closet, leave the door slightly open. If building an enclosure, leave a small opening at or near the top. (I don't ventilate because my bathroom never heats up as high as even 90 degrees with the door shut, and I can't smell any outgassing. That's one reason why you ought to use solid wood as opposed to plywood for your board.)

I got all my supplies at Walmart and Lowe's. You should avoid Sylvania bulbs as they are too concentrated, from what I've researched. I used GE bulbs. I got my information from

http://www.drlwilson.com/

Also, you can find this same information at:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2002_Nov/ai_9373...

This is the Townsend newsletter for doctors and patients.

Hope this is helpful to you!

Juniper Berry

P.S. There is a Far Infrared Sauna forum on Curezone, too!


_Original_Message_ﰩ

Constructing a Sauna at Home

Materials.

four 250-watt, red infrared bulbs (heat lamps),
four flush-mount bulb sockets,
one 15 foot long extension cord rated for 1625 watts)
pine board (14-15 inches by 40-48 inches)
an on-off switch (wall switch, cover, and box)
a thermometer (optional).

If you are building an enclosure, it can be of wood, glass or cardboard. No special materials or construction are required because the temperature stays mild. Build the unit at least 4' by 3' by 6' high. The heat may dissipate if the space is too large. Siding made of cedar or fir is a popular option. The tongue-and-groove siding slides into a frame and no nails are needed. Walls can be built as modules, then screwed together. (I don't have an enclosure. I just lean my board against the bathroom door, as my bathroom is very small.)

Construction. For the one-person sauna, mount the sockets on the plywood or enclosure wall in a diamond shape. The bottom socket is in the center, 12" from the bottom. Two sockets are 28" from the bottom of the plywood and 10" apart. The top socket is centered and 36" from the bottom. This should form a narrow diamond shape.

I drilled four holes at the appropriate locations in the wood before attaching the wired sockets so that none of the wiring would show. Wire the sockets together in parallel so one bad bulb won't disable the unit. In other words, cut the cord into five pieces: one section of cord will go to each bulb from the switch. The long cord that remains will already have a plug attached to the end, and that will connect to the other pole on the switch. Your cord needs to be copper. Mine had numerous thin strands of copper for both the "hot" wire, and the "neutral" wire. I'm not an electrician, but with the internet, you can learn to do anything, right? I made sure that the side of the wire that was embossed was the side that connected to the "hot" contact on the socket and the pole on the switch. I wired the four "hot" wires together before attaching them to the switch. I wired all five of the "neutral" wires together without going through the switch. It sounds complicated if you've never wired before, and if you are mechanically handicapped, you might want to get some proper help completing your sauna board.

With each use, instead of plugging the unit in, it is easier to have a switch. The best is probably a wall switch that can handle 1000 watts with an outlet box. Keep sweaty hands off the switch as they could cause a short.

The bulbs must be the red type, 250 watts each. Do not use the clear ones as their spectrum is not correct. You must not touch the bulbs during use, or let water or anything touch them. Observe all cautions as with any appliance exposed to heat and moisture.

If children or the disabled will use the unit, consider a protective screen. Bend some chicken or stucco wire around the bulbs and staple it to the wood. Another way is to recess the bulbs or place them in reflectors. If building an enclosure, you could place the bulbs behind. The enclosure needs be small enough to hold the heat, and large enough to allow turning around.

Ventilate the sauna no matter where you locate it. In a bathroom or closet, leave the door slightly open. If building an enclosure, leave a small opening at or near the top. (I don't ventilate because my bathroom never heats up as high as even 90 degrees with the door shut, and I can't smell any outgassing. That's one reason why you ought to use solid wood as opposed to plywood for your board.)

I got all my supplies at Walmart and Lowe's. You should avoid Sylvania bulbs as they are too concentrated, from what I've researched. I used GE bulbs. I got my information from drwilson.com, but his domain has expired and it won't let me get back on. I luckily had printed out the information already. Also, you can find this same information at:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2002_Nov/ai_9373...

This is the Townsend newsletter for doctors and patients.

Hope this is helpful to you!

Juniper Berry

 

 
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