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Re: High meat intake increases diabetes risk
 

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RyanD Views: 5,244
Published: 11 years ago
 
This is a reply to # 1,658,132

Re: High meat intake increases diabetes risk



Studies studies studies! Which one to believe! I prefer the type that are supported by history ,like the one below.




Part 5: The evidence that a low-carb, saturated fat diet better for diabetics

Since the adoption of a low-fat diet as "healthy" in the early 1980s, diabetics have been put on such diets. Nobody thought to actually test whether they worked, with the results we see now of rising diabetes and obesity throughout the Western world. However, there were more enlightened scientists who saw the way things were going. Despite the expense and difficulty getting funding for trials which would not be of commercial benefit to drug and food producers, tests have been conducted into low-carbohydrate, high fat diets in diabetes. They have demonstrated pretty convincingly that a high-fat diet is far healthier for diabetics than the conventional "five portions of fruit and vegetables a day" advice diabetics usually get.

Here is some of the evidence.

The evidence on this page is very recent. But this evidence is not new — we really have known some of it for over a century (see the story of William Banting and the studies which followed. And there never has been any convincing evidence that a fatty diet causes heart disease (see The Cholesterol Myth and Gary Taubes' article, The Soft Science of Dietary Fat )

In the 3 August 2002 edition of the British Medical Journal an editorial entitled "Prevention and cure of type 2 diabetes: Weight loss is the key to controlling the diabetes epidemic" ( BMJ 2002;325:232-233), said just that. It is generally accepted that weight loss is probably the best way to treat diabetics who, usually are overweight, because:

a reduction in weight of 10kg (22 lbs):
# Reduces Hba1c more than Metformin
# Reduces diabetes-related deaths
# Improves blood lipids, without drugs
# Improves blood pressure, without drugs


The difficulty is to reduce weight without increasing the risk of a heart attack or damaging arteries. So with that in mind here are two studies which do just that — by reducing carbohydrates and increasing fats:

Sharman MJ, Kraemer WJ, Love DM, Avery NG, Gomez AL, Scheett TP, Volek JS. A ketogenic diet favorably affects serum biomarkers for cardiovascular disease in normal-weight men. J Nutr 2002; 132: 1879-85

Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs 06269-1110, USA.

Very low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets are popular yet little is known regarding the effects on serum biomarkers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the effects of a 6-wk ketogenic diet on fasting and postprandial serum biomarkers in 20 normal-weight, normolipidemic men.
Twelve men switched from their habitual diet (17% protein, 47% carbohydrate and 32% fat) to a ketogenic diet (30% protein, 8% carbohydrate and 61% fat) and eight control subjects consumed their habitual diet for 6 wk. Fasting blood lipids, insulin, LDL particle size, oxidized LDL and postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and insulin responses to a fat-rich meal were determined before and after treatment.
There were significant decreases in fasting serum TAG (-33%), postprandial lipemia after a fat-rich meal (-29%), and fasting serum insulin concentrations (-34%) after men consumed the ketogenic diet. Fasting serum total and LDL cholesterol and oxidized LDL were unaffected and HDL cholesterol tended to increase with the ketogenic diet (+11.5%; P = 0.066). In subjects with a predominance of small LDL particles pattern B, there were significant increases in mean and peak LDL particle diameter and the percentage of LDL-1 after the ketogenic diet. There were no significant changes in blood lipids in the control group. To our knowledge this is the first study to document the effects of a ketogenic diet on fasting and postprandial CVD biomarkers independent of weight loss. The results suggest that a short-term ketogenic diet does not have a deleterious effect on CVD risk profile and may improve the lipid disorders characteristic of atherogenic dyslipidemia.

# COMMENT: with a diet in which 61% of calories came from fat, you might expect that cholesterol, etc, would rise. In fact, it did just the opposite. The figures are: fasting serum triacylglycerol - 33%
# postprandial lipaemia - 29%
# postprandial insulin - 34%
# HDL +11.5%
# Total cholesterol was unchanged



http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/diabetes-5.html
 

 
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