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Published: 17 years ago
 
This is a reply to # 412,393

Actually no.


First lets look at a more general definition of calculi seen below.

I think we can agree that a cholesterol calculi would be considered a lump...yes?

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Calculi
Stones or solid lumps such as gallstones

Now lets look at the definition that you posted. One thing I immediately noticed was the word "usually" in reference to mineral salts. Now the word "usually" to me means most of the time but not always...how about you? Now I think we can agree that most cholesterol stones probably contain some varying amounts of mineral salts and others can be made of pure cholesterol...known as a cholesterol calculi. So you see I am pretty familiar with the definitions and lingo.

http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/english/Ca/Calculi.html
An abnormal concretion occurring mostly in the urinary and biliary tracts, usually composed of mineral salts. Also called stones. (references)

Now your accusing me of not reading the material you posted( which is not true) while it appears you are not reading what I am writing. Please show me one instance where I ever mentioned looking for stones in the pig livers and gall bladders. I'll save you the trouble there isn't any such statement made by me. In fact if you would read what I posted I even stated that there was no way these pigs would have stones they are only 8 months old!! Please read what I write as I read what you write it will save us from having to make these corrections of misattributions.

FYI: Pigs are used in research because their digestive systems are near identical to ours. One very big difference which Adelita and Blueduck (I don't blame them they just aren't familiar with the care, feeding and growth of animals on a farm) appear to not understand is that pigs grow a lot faster than humans. A 200 pound pig is only 6 months old so no researcher would expect them to have stones....does that make sense to you two?

Did you notice in the links I provided that they can even diagnose cholesterol stones because they can observe them floating...seems pretty detectable to me...how about you??

Also you are now stating that the composition of stones now contain calcium. Wouldn't this make they easier to detect than you previously stated. I also see that you have not yet read the links which clearly state that cholesterol (pure) floating stones are easily detected via ultrasound. No calcium needed for detection thus they are not invisible.
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First lets look at a more general definition of calculi seen below.

I think we can agree that a cholesterol calculi would be considered a lump...yes?
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Calculi
Stones or solid lumps such as gallstones

Now lets look at the definition that you posted. One thing I immediately noticed was the word usually in reference to mineral salts. Now the word "usually" to me means most of the time but not always...how about you? Now I think we can agree that most cholesterol stones probably contain some varying amounts of mineral salts and others can be made of pure cholesterol...known as a cholesterol calculi. So you see I am pretty familiar with the definitions and lingo.

http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/english/Ca/Calculi.html
An abnormal concretion occurring mostly in the urinary and biliary tracts, usually composed of mineral salts. Also called stones. (references)

Now your accusing me of not reading the material you posted( which is not true) while it appears you are not reading what I am writing. Please show me one instance where I ever mentioned looking for stones in the pig livers and gall bladders. I'll save you the trouble there isn't any such statement made by me. In fact if would read what I posted I even stated that there was no way these pigs would have stones they are only 8 months old!! Please read what I write as I read what you right it will save us from having to make these corrections of misattributions.

Did you notice in the links I provided that they can even diagnose cholesterol stones because they can observe them floating...seems pretty detectable to me...how about you??

Also you are now stating that the composition of stones now contain calcium. Wouldn't this make they easier to detect than you previously stated. I also see that you have not yet read the links which clearly state that cholesterol (pure) floating stones are easily detected via ultrasound. No calcium needed for detection thus they are not invisible.
 

 
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